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Archive for October 9th, 2007


Oct 9, 2007

Scott Kelby Gives Up Photoshop for Music

Photo by Larry Becker
phoenix1.jpg

Photo by Larry Becker

Scott Kelby, President of NAPP and all round Photoshop Guru™ has given up Photoshop and returned to music–for one nite only–last Friday nite.

Oct 9, 2007

How Warhol, Hockney’s Photos Led to Revolution

modern-life.jpg

Source: Bloomberg.com
Written by Martin Gayford

Oct. 8 (Bloomberg) — The love-hate affair between painting and photography has been simmering ever since the latter was invented. In the interval, photographers have often imitated the effects of painting, and — as a new show at London’s Hayward Gallery documents — many painters have worked from photographs.

Oct 9, 2007

Adobe grows by 260% in Russia

According to Adobe first year operation results Russia has been called one of the most priority countries. By QIII FY 2007Adobe sales in Russia grew by 260%. The company’s local Representation Office has got its development plan.

Source: cnews (Russian IT Review)

The company Adobe has announced its results of being present in the Russian market for a year. Adobe most demanded product is currently Creative Suite 3, then goes Adobe Photoshop and Acrobat. Pavel Cherkashin, Head of the company’s Representation Office in Russia, states product packages are in greater demand than separate programs.

Oct 9, 2007

Interpol Untwirls a Suspected Pedophile

interpol_1901.jpgSource: The New York Times Blogs
Written by Mike Nizza

The world locked eyes with a suspected pedophile today after a lot of digital photo manipulation and an apparently unprecedented global appeal by Interpol to help find him. From Agence France-Presse:

“For years, images of this man sexually abusing children have been circulating on the Internet,” Interpol chief Ronald Noble said in a statement.

Oct 9, 2007

Adobe shows off 3D camera tech

Dave Story shows off a multi-lens array.
(Credit: Audioblog.fr)

Source: CNET
Written by Stephen Shankland

Today, if you want to trim all the distracting background out of a picture–say, the crowd behind your daughter playing soccer–you have to do a lot of artful selection with high-powered software such as Photoshop. But what if your computer understood the depth of the image, just as you did when you took the picture, and could be told to just erase everything that’s a certain distance behind your kid?