PhotoshopNews » Tips http://photoshopnews.com The latest news about the top pixel wrangling application on the planet. Sun, 17 Jul 2011 17:19:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.5.1 Removing sensor marks in Photoshop CS5 http://photoshopnews.com/2010/04/13/removing-sensor-marks-in-photoshop-cs5/ http://photoshopnews.com/2010/04/13/removing-sensor-marks-in-photoshop-cs5/#comments Tue, 13 Apr 2010 17:05:15 +0000 Martin Evening http://photoshopnews.com/?p=3119 Divide-before-low divide-after-low

Photoshop CS5 was announced this week and we have seen a wealth of new features for photographers, more so than any other version of Photoshop I can think of. By now you may already have had a chance to see some of the star new features in action such as Content-Aware filling, Puppet Warp and the new Merge to HDR Pro. Tucked away in Photoshop CS5 are a bunch of other smaller features, which nevertheless can be put to good use. In this article I wanted to focus on the new Divide blend mode. It took me a while to work out what it could be useful for, until Chris Cox who helped point me in the right direction by explaining that it could be useful for carrying out what is usually referred to as a ‘flat field calibration’. In other words, you could use the Divide blend mode to remove lens vignetting and stubborn sensor spots.

Read more…

Some specialist digital capture systems, such as those used in astronomy and microscopy already offer their own software solutions to achieve this kind of sensor clean-up processing. However, with the new Divide blend mode you can carry out flat field calibrations for any type of digital camera system. Be warned that this is a tricky technique to get right. This method may in some circumstances help you cut down on the time spent retouching, providing you are able to capture a valid flat field calibration image close to the time when the other photos were shot.

Divide-01
1 The first step was to capture an image of an evenly lit white surface, exposed so that the center was 100% white. The key thing was to make sure the illumination was even and defocus the camera so as not to pick up any subject texture. It was also important to capture this image at the same aperture as I was going to shoot with since this would affect the definition of the sensor dust picked up by the camera. Since the high-end display I work with has uniform brightness, I got good results by photographing the computer display with a white desktop. I shot at a low ISO setting to keep the noise to a minimum. I also bracketed the exposures so that I had the opportunity to choose the most suitable image – one that was bright enough to apply a Divide blend mode calibration and required minimal further image adjustments to the brightness.

Divide-02a
2 Shown here is the original image before adding the calibration layer in Divide blend mode.

Divide-03
3 I placed the flat field calibration layer above the background layer of an image shot with the same camera at the same lens aperture and set the blend mode to ‘Divide’ at 100%.

Divide-04

4 Here you can see the modified version where the divide blend mode calibration layer canceled out the lens vignetting and all the sensor spots. The net result was a modified image in which the added layer canceled out the sensor marks that were present in the original and removed any lens vignetting.

Divide-05a Divide-05b

5 However, it was important to fine-tune the brightness of this layer using a clipping Curves layer so that the calibration layer in Divide mode precisely canceled out the sensor marks on the layer below. Once I had got the adjustment right for this image. the same setting could be used on other subsequent photos.

Divide-06

6 One of the reasons I chose to include this technique was to show what the new Divide blend mode could be useful for. In all honesty, I think the easiest approach would be to use the Camera Raw Lens Corrections adjustments to take care of the vignetting and use the remove spots tool in Camera Raw to remove the dust marks and synchronize the spotting adjustments across all the other affected photos. This could certainly work well for an image like the one shown here. On the other hand, if you have a problem with a particularly dusty sensor or the dust marks fall on top of areas where it would be tricky to retouch, the flat field calibration technique might just save the day. As you can see in the close-up views shown here, I was able to do a good job of removing most of the spots. However, I was only able to partially remove the big dust mark in the top left corner. It would have been unrealistic to have expected a better result than this for such a large sensor mark.

Adobe Photoshop CS5 for Photographers (Focal Press).
ISBN: 0780240522005
This extract was taken from Adobe Photoshop CS5 for Photographers. This latest update in the Adobe Photoshop for Photographers series will contain 768 pages in full color, plus a DVD containing video tutorials. The book layout has been further improved to make navigation easier and contains updated advice on everything you need to know about using Photoshop, from digital capture to print output, as well as all that is new in Adobe Photoshop CS5.

9780240521251

The title will be stocked in most major bookstores throughout the world and also available to purchase from:
www.focalpress.com as well as through the on-line bookstores: www.amazon.com and www.amazon.co.uk.

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Perspective correction for Camera Raw images http://photoshopnews.com/2009/05/06/perspective-correction-for-camera-raw-images/ http://photoshopnews.com/2009/05/06/perspective-correction-for-camera-raw-images/#comments Wed, 06 May 2009 06:59:47 +0000 Martin Evening http://photoshopnews.com/?p=3058 acr-perspective1
Click to view movie

This movie extract is from  Adobe Photoshop CS4 for Photographers: The Ultimate Workshop.

One of the top requests for Camera Raw and Lightroom has been to include perspective corrections, so that users can apply perspective corrections to raw images. It so happens there is already a method in Camera Raw and Photoshop that will allow you to correct the perspective of a raw photograph while keeping the image in its original raw file state. This isn’t exactly a hidden feature in Camera Raw, but this movie does demonstrate a workaround for correcting perspective of raw files while keeping them fully editable in Camera Raw. Here’s how it can be done.

Please note this video is in Quicktime format. A player can be downloaded from apple.com.

This movie extract is a smaller version of the one found on the DVD disc that comes with  Adobe Photoshop CS4 for Photographers: The Ultimate Workshop, jointly authored by Martin Evening and Jeff Schewe. The book is published by Focal Press and contains 400 pages of tutorials and tips on how to achieve the best results out of Camera Raw and Photoshop. You can also find out more about the book by visiting the Photoshop for Photographers website where you can preview more of the content that will be appearing in this book.

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Photoshop weightloss http://photoshopnews.com/2009/04/20/photoshop-weightloss/ http://photoshopnews.com/2009/04/20/photoshop-weightloss/#comments Mon, 20 Apr 2009 16:23:05 +0000 Jeff Schewe http://photoshopnews.com/?p=3040 weightloss
Click here to view movie

This movie extract is from  Adobe Photoshop CS4 for Photographers: The Ultimate Workshop.

You know how the camera always seems to add 10 lbs.? You can shave those extra pounds away using Photoshop. This demo shows two methods of making people look thinner. And, if you do it with subtlety, you’ll never know that is was Photoshop that took those extra pounds off–and your clients will think you are a genius!

Please note this video is in Quicktime format. A player can be downloaded from apple.com.

This movie extract can be found on the DVD disc that comes with  Adobe Photoshop CS4 for Photographers: The Ultimate Workshop, jointly authored by Martin Evening and Jeff Schewe. The book is published by Focal Press and contains 400 pages of tutorials and tips on how to achieve the best results out of Camera Raw and Photoshop. You can also find out more about the book by visiting the Photoshop for Photographers website where you can preview more of the content that will be appearing in this book.

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Image Stacks in Photoshop CS3 Extended http://photoshopnews.com/2007/03/27/image-stacks-in-photoshop-cs3-extended/ http://photoshopnews.com/2007/03/27/image-stacks-in-photoshop-cs3-extended/#comments Tue, 27 Mar 2007 11:28:42 +0000 Martin Evening http://photoshopnews.com/2007/03/27/image-stacks-in-photoshop-cs3-extended/ align-stacks-04.jpg

Of all the new features in Photoshop CS3, those that stand out for me most are the ones that have been built around the new Align Content feature, engineered by Jeff Chien.

For example, you can use Align Content in Perspective mode to align group portraits and it is now possible to create really accurate Photomerge composites automatically.

Now that Adobe has announced Photoshop CS3 Extended alongside the regular version of Photoshop CS3, we can let you know about what some of the extended features will allow you to do. Of these, the Image Stacks rendering is, in my view at least, one of the most interesting new features in Photoshop CS3, better than Live Filters.

The new Stacks feature was engineered by Chris Cox and was originally designed as a tool for analytical work, where you could place a series of images together in alignment and apply a Stacks rendering to the layers and use this to process them in such a way that Photoshop will highlight the differences found between the layers, or as is shown below, blend the layers according to where there is a high frequency of recurring pixel values to display only the most commonly occuring pixel values. But I have also managed to discover several key creative uses for Image Stacks.

For this first demo, I had a series of six pictures where there was always at least one person walking through a scene. Using image stacks, I was able to automatically remove them from the shot.

align-stacks-01a.jpg

Figure 1- Here is a sequence of photographs that were shot hand held over a time period of a minute or so. There were a lot of people walking in front of the fountain and I just made sure that I captured enough shots so that each portion of the picture had two or more frames where someone wasn’t in front of the camera.

align-stacks-02.jpg

Figure 2- I opened all of these photographs in Photoshop and went to the File ➯ Scripts menu to choose: Load Files into Stack. This opened the dialog shown here, where I chose Use: Open Files and checked the Attempt to Automaticallly Align Source Images and Create Smart Object after Loading Layers options.

align-stacks-03a.jpgalign-stacks-03b.jpg

Figure 3- Depending on how many pictures you have and how large they are, it may take a few minutes to process all the photographs. What you will end up with will be a new document with a Smart Object layer that contains all the previously open image documents as layers grouped within the smart object. If you double-click on the Smart Object layer you will see the full expanded list of layers contained in this Smart Object.

align-stacks-04.jpg

align-stacks-04a.jpg

Figure 4- And now for the clever part. If you have the Smart Object open, make sure you close it again. You will want to start with the Smart Object selected (see the Layers palette top left). Go to the Layer menu and choose Smart Objects ➯ Image Stack Mode ➯ Median. Again, the stacks rendering may take a little while to complete. In the result shown here, the Median rendering managed to blend the layers such that nearly all of the people in the merged picture disapppeared completely.

align-stacks-05.jpg

Figure 5- The image stack median rendering did a pretty good job of removing the people, but there were still a few ghost outlines left. Obviously some people were having too good a time in the sun to want to move around much. Plus there were a few bits of rubbish and artifacts around the edges of the picture where the frames had overlapped. I tidied up the final picture by adding a little bit of spotting on a new layer and added some masked curves adjustment layers to provide some dodging and burning to produce the final version shown here.

Tips for getting the best results
When you see this technique demonstrated it does at first look quite magical, but there is a logical explanation for how the process works. The technique relies mainly on the use of the auto-align command to align a chosen set of sample images together and place them within a grouped smart object. After doing a little bit of experimentation I have found that if you record at least five or six (or more) exposures, this should provide enough separate images for Photoshop to process in order to work out which pixels appear most frequently at any particular spot in the picture and use the most commonly occurring pixels only to produce the finished blend shown here.

Removing noise using multiple exposures
Here is a technique that makes use of the Stacks feature in Photoshop CS3 to merge a set of identical exposures and obtain a smoother-looking image.

lowlight-01.jpg

Figure 6
lowlighttest-1b.jpg

Figure 7
lowlighttest-1a.jpg
Figure 8- I started by going to the File menu and choosing Scripts ➯ Load Files into Stack and selected a set of five images to open that had all been shot at identical exposures of a subject with the camera fixed to the tripod. These were photographs that had been shot at a high ISO setting using a long exposure in low light conditions. I checked the Align Source images and Create Smart Object options and clicked OK.

lowlighttest-2a.jpg

Figure 9- The selected images opened as a single image document grouped together as a single smart object. If I were to double-click on the smart object icon, this would open the smart object in a separate document window and allow me access to all the individual layers, which wasn’t necessary in this case, but would be if you wanted to edit any of the individual layers.

lowlight-02.jpg

Figure 10
lowlighttest-3a.jpg

Figure 11- Back in the original Smart Object document, I went to the Layer menu and chose Image Stacks ➯ Image Stack Rendering ➯ Median. The processing may take a little while, depending on the size and number of layers, plus bit depth. Once completed, you will notice how the Smart Object layer has a ‘stacks’ icon indicating the smart object has been rendered using the stacks feature.
lowlight-03.jpg

Figure 12

lowlight-04.jpg

Figure 13- Here is a comparison showing a close-up view of a single exposure (Figure 12) and a rendered version (Figure 13) where five separate exposures were merged to produce a smoother, noise-free image. The Median rendering was used here because it analyzes the image content on all the layers and averages out the pixel values to use the most commonly occurring pixel values only, thereby elminating nearly all of the noisy pixels that occur on each of the layers.

Median versus Mean
If you are processing a series of still life captures, then a Mean stacks rendering can remove more noise than Median. For example, if you were processing astronomy pictures, you would want to use a Mean rendering.

The techniques shown here are fairly easy to accomplish. The Align Content feature is so good at recognizing areas of similarity and aligning images together as layers, that you can quite easily get away without having to use a tripod to shoot the pictures that you want to combine together. So anytime you are in a situation where you think it might be useful to remove people from a shot or you want to improve upon the image quailty capture potential of a lowlight scene, just shoot a quick sequence of shots with the camera hand held, keeping it as still as possible.

About Martin Evening

evening.jpgMartin, if you don’t know, is a London based advertising photographer and noted expert in both photography and digital imaging. As a successful photographer, Martin is well known in London for his fashion and beauty work. Check out Martin’s web site.

Martin also works with the Adobe Photoshop engineering team consulting on new feature development and alpha and beta testing. He worked alpha & beta for Photoshop CS3 and Adobe Photoshop Lightroom and was influential with the new Adobe Bridge 2.0 and Camera Raw 4.0.

In addition, Martin is also a principal of PixelGenius where he designed and was product manger for the recently released PhotoKit Color 2. PhotoKit Color 2 applies precise color corrections, automatic color balancing and creative coloring effects. PhotoKit Color offers a comprehensive set of coloring tools for Photoshop 7.0, CS, CS2 (and soon CS3) for both Macintosh and Windows.

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Working with the Clone Source palette in CS3 http://photoshopnews.com/2006/12/28/working-with-the-clone-source-palette-in-cs3/ http://photoshopnews.com/2006/12/28/working-with-the-clone-source-palette-in-cs3/#comments Thu, 28 Dec 2006 05:35:01 +0000 PSN Editorial Staff http://photoshopnews.com/2006/12/28/working-with-the-clone-source-palette-in-cs3/ evening-sm.jpgMartin Evening’s Favorite Photoshop CS3 Feature?
The new Clone Source palette

Pubished here is a tutorial extract is taken from Martin Evening’s forthcoming book: Adobe Photoshop CS3 for Photographers, published by Focal Press. In this tutorial, Martin demonstrates some of the key new benefits that can be gained from working with the new Clone Source palette in the newly released public beta version of Adobe Photoshop CS3. To find out more about how to use this new feature, read on…

The Clone Source palette is new to Photoshop and useful for photographic retouching mainly because it allows you to see a preview of the alignment of the pixels that you are about to clone with. All the other features, such as the multiple sample points are really of more use for people working in video editing, where it is desirable to store multiple clone sources when you want to clone in exact registration from one frame to another across several images in a sequence.

clonestamp-01.jpg

1. Here is a photograph in which there is a litter bin that I wish to remove. But the tricky thing here is that the bin is just in front of a circular alcove, and this would normally make it less easy to remove. But not so if you use the controls avialable in the Clone Source palette.

clonestamp-02.jpg

2. To start with, I wanted to remove the bottom of the bin. This could be done normally by placing the source point for the clone stamp on the edge of the black line and estimating where to click with the clone stamp so that you can continue painting along the line ‘in register’.

clone-stamp-02aa.jpg
3. By using the Clone Source palette, I can now switch on the Show Overlay option and adjust the opacity, so that with the Auto Hide option turned on as well, when I release the mouse, I get to see a ghost image preview of how the pixels will be painted at the destination point. This takes away all the guess work and makes it much easier to paint with the clone stamp in perfect alignment with the underlying image.

clonestamp-03.jpg

4. I now switched tools and selected the healing brush. And this time I went to the Clone Source palette and set the clone source angle to be 180º relative to the destination. This meant that when I sampled using the pixels from the top right corner of the curve, the preview showed a 180º rotated preview of where the the pixels would be painted at the destination point. Again, the overlay was very important, because I could use it to precisely align the preview with the image below, so that the edge of the circle was precisely aligned.

clonestamp-04.jpg

5. Here is a screenshot showing the healing brush in action.

clone-stamp-03aa.jpg
6. Because I had the Auto Hide option checked still, the overlay was temporarily hidden as I painted.

clonestamp-05.jpg

7. And here is the final result, in which I only had to carry out some minor extra retouching in order to tidy up the remaining parts of the picture.

Overlay blend modes
You can adjust the opacity of the Clone Source overlay and change the blend mode as well. In some instances you may find it useful to work with the Difference blend mode at 100%. The Difference blend mode will show a solid black preview when identical pixels are in register.

About the book
cover-versioncs3-low.jpgThis extract was taken from Adobe Photoshop CS3 for Photographers, published by Focal Press. The new edition of this best selling book should be hitting the streets in Spring of 2007, shortly after the official release of Photoshop CS3.

As a special perk for PhotoshopNews readers, Martin has made his Chapter 1: What’s New in Photoshop CS3 available for free download.

The 21 page PDF, outlines all the new features of Photoshop CS3 and Bridge 2, written from a user’s perspective. It offers an honest appraisal of what will be on offer in this new version of the program, if you really want to know what’s NEW!

Click here to download the PDF(3.2MB)

Martin, if you don’t know, is a London based advertising photographer and noted expert in both photography and digital imaging. As a successful photographer, Martin is well known in London for his fashion and beauty work. Check out Martin’s web site.

Martin also works with the Adobe Photoshop engineering team consulting on new feature development and alpha and beta testing. He worked alpha & beta for Photoshop CS3 and Adobe Photoshop Lightroom and was influential with the new Adobe Bridge 2.0 and Camera Raw 4.0.

In addition, Martin is also a principal of PixelGenius where he designed and was product manger for the recently released PhotoKit Color 2. PhotoKit Color 2 applies precise color corrections, automatic color balancing and creative coloring effects. PhotoKit Color offers a comprehensive set of coloring tools for Photoshop 7.0, CS, CS2 (and soon CS3) for both Macintosh and Windows.

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Russell Brown Releases CS3 Video Tutorials http://photoshopnews.com/2006/12/15/russell-brown-releases-cs3-video-tutorials/ http://photoshopnews.com/2006/12/15/russell-brown-releases-cs3-video-tutorials/#comments Fri, 15 Dec 2006 18:53:28 +0000 Russell Preston Brown http://photoshopnews.com/2006/12/15/russell-brown-releases-cs3-video-tutorials/
The Mad Doctor is at it again-producing Adobe Photoshop CS2 video tutorials.

CS3 Smart Filters
Posted 12/14/2006
Apply nondestructive filters to Smart Object layers.
Requires Adobe Photoshop CS3
Quicktime Tutorial; 4.1MB

CS3 The All New Photomerge
Posted12/14/2006
Discover the updated Photomerge technology found in this new version of Photoshop.
Requires Adobe Photoshop CS3
QuickTime Tutorial; 9 MB

CS3 Converting Color to Black & White
Posted 12/14/2006
Finally, an easy to use black and white conversion technique built into Photoshop CS3.
Requires Adobe Photoshop CS3
QuickTime Tutorial; 5.2 MB

CS3 Auto-Align and Auto-Blend Layers
Posted 12/14/2006
Align multi-layered documents with perfect registration and then magically blend overlapping edges.
Requires Adobe Photoshop CS3
QuickTime Tutorial; 9.9 MB

Check out the Russell Brown Show for additional news & info.

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What’s new in Photoshop CS3 for Photographers http://photoshopnews.com/2006/12/14/whats-new-in-photoshop-cs3-for-photographers/ http://photoshopnews.com/2006/12/14/whats-new-in-photoshop-cs3-for-photographers/#comments Thu, 14 Dec 2006 22:34:54 +0000 PSN Editorial Staff http://photoshopnews.com/2006/12/14/whats-new-in-photoshop-cs3-for-photographers/ cover-versioncs3-low.jpgTo coincide with the announcement and availability of Photoshop CS3 as a public beta, Martin Evening has released a sample chapter from his forthcoming book: Adobe Photoshop CS3 for Photographers, published by Focal Press.

The new edition of this best selling book should be hitting the streets in Spring of 2007, shortly after the official release of Photoshop CS3.

As a special perk for PhotoshopNews readers, Martin has made his Chapter 1: What’s New in Photoshop CS3 available for free download.

The 21 page PDF, outlines all the new features of Photoshop CS3 and Bridge 2, written from a user’s perspective. It offers an honest appraisal of what will be on offer in this new version of the program, if you really want to know what’s NEW!

Click here to download the PDF (3.56 mbs)

evening.jpgMartin, if you don’t know, is a London based advertising photographer and noted expert in both photography and digital imaging. As a successful photographer, Martin is well known in London for his fashion and beauty work. Check out Martin’s web site.

Martin also works with the Adobe Photoshop engineering team consulting on new feature development and alpha and beta testing. He worked alpha & beta for Photoshop CS3 and Adobe Photoshop Lightroom and was influential with the new Adobe Bridge 2.0 and Camera Raw 4.0.

In addition, Martin is also a principal of PixelGenius where he designed and was product manger for the recently released PhotoKit Color 2. PhotoKit Color 2 applies precise color corrections, automatic color balancing and creative coloring effects. PhotoKit Color offers a comprehensive set of coloring tools for Photoshop 7.0, CS, CS2 (and soon CS3) for both Macintosh and Windows.

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NAPP Launches Photoshop CS3 Learning Center http://photoshopnews.com/2006/12/14/napp-launches-photoshop-cs3-learning-center/ http://photoshopnews.com/2006/12/14/napp-launches-photoshop-cs3-learning-center/#comments Thu, 14 Dec 2006 22:32:27 +0000 PSN Editorial Staff http://photoshopnews.com/2006/12/14/napp-launches-photoshop-cs3-learning-center/ cs3-learningcenter.png

CS3 Learning Center Offers Tutorials, New Feature Overviews, Exclusive Interviews and More for the Newly-Released Adobe(R) Photoshop(R) CS3 Public Beta Preview

The National Association of Photoshop Professionals (NAPP) is excited to announce the launch of their most comprehensive online learning center ever in conjunction with the release of the Adobe® Photoshop® Creative Suite 3 public beta preview. The CS3 Learning Center is now live and available at www.photoshopuser.com/cs3.

“Adobe did the right thing by releasing this first-ever public beta preview of Photoshop CS3,” said Scott Kelby, NAPP president and editor-in-chief of Photoshop User and Layers magazines. “This is a huge boon to Mac users because CS3 is optimized to run on Apple’s Intel-based machines, and I can tell you from personal experience – it just screams! They included the Windows users too, so everybody gets a chance to take this amazing new upgrade for a spin. This free public beta preview is a big risk for Adobe, but I applaud them for taking that risk and doing what’s right for their customers on both platforms.”

The CS3 Learning Center is loaded with 12 online video tutorials; an interview with John Nack, Adobe product manager; an overview of CS3′s top features; a special episode of Adobe® Photoshop® TV: Photoshop CS3 Secrets Revealed, and more. Also, visitors can jump-start their CS3 experience with a free 7-day online CS3 training course with Dave Cross, NAPP senior developer of education and curriculum, available off the CS3 Learning Center, too.

About NAPP

The National Association of Photoshop Professionals (NAPP) is an accredited, dynamic trade association and the world’s leading resource for Adobe® Photoshop® training, news, and education. An award-winning team of Photoshop experts, authors, consultants, and trainers lead the association keeping its members on the cutting edge of Adobe Photoshop techniques and technology. With more than 54,000 members in 106 countries, NAPP is the largest graphics and digital imaging association worldwide. Visit http://www.photoshopuser.com for more information.

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Bert Monroy Does PixelPerfect Podcasts http://photoshopnews.com/2006/10/17/bert-monroy-does-pixelperfect-podcasts/ http://photoshopnews.com/2006/10/17/bert-monroy-does-pixelperfect-podcasts/#comments Tue, 17 Oct 2006 17:10:31 +0000 PSN Editorial Staff http://photoshopnews.com/2006/10/17/bert-monroy-does-pixelperfect-podcasts/ monroy-2.jpg
Bert Monroy’s PixelPerfect Podcast on Revision3

About the show: Be amazed and learn as master digital artist Bert Monroy takes a stylus and a digital pad and treats it as Monet and Picasso do with oil and canvas. Learn the tips and tricks you need to whip those digital pictures into shape.

Episode I covers using photoshop in fantasy art. Create lightning, sparkles, and a mystical vortex the same way professional effects and movie matte artists do.

Episode II Bert teaches how Photoshop is also capable of animation.

About Bert Monroy

Bert Monroy is one of the pioneers of digital art and co-author of the first book written on Photoshop, The Official Adobe Photoshop Handbook. His work has been seen in every major trade publication of the computer industry. Additionally, his work has been featured in scores of books including Making Art on a Macintosh, The Photoshop WOW Book, The Illustrator WOW Book, The Art of Digital Painting, The Grey Book and The Photoshop A to Z in Japan.

Bert recently unvieled his “Monster Painting” (Read the PhotoshopNews story). The printed size is 40 inches by 120 inches and was produced from a Photoshop file that weighs in at 1.7 gigs–flat!

You can also read the PSN story First Time With Photoshop – Bert Monroy where he recounts the first time he saw and worked in Photoshop-in 1998!

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Editing your digital images without the mystery, Part II: Retouching techniques 101 http://photoshopnews.com/2005/10/18/editing-your-digital-images-without-the-mystery-part-ii-retouching-techniques-101/ http://photoshopnews.com/2005/10/18/editing-your-digital-images-without-the-mystery-part-ii-retouching-techniques-101/#comments Tue, 18 Oct 2005 15:15:10 +0000 PSN Editorial Staff http://photoshopnews.com/?p=767 Source: ars technica
Written By Dave Girard

Introduction

Welcome back to the Digital Imaging Without the Mystery workshop and thank you for not commenting on my lack of a shirt. We can’t stop the dissemination of knowledge just because it’s laundry day so let’s just STOP STARING AT MY TATTOO OF A BUTTERFLY and move right along. If you’re here for the first time, you might want to read the first workshop since this builds on some fundamentals established there.

As I mentioned before, this is intended to be platform- and application-agnostic, but there are certain workflow things that might be specific to Photoshop since I’m more acquainted with it. The major things like masks and quick masks apply to most editors. Since the last workshop, forum member tipped me off to a http://www.earthboundlight.com/phototips/photoshop-elements-curves.html
for Adobe Photoshop Elements that adds the essential curves adjustment and resolves the major gripe I have with PS Elements as a decent image editor. I recommend checking it out if you want a lot more power when it comes to handling many balance and contrast adjustments. These final two guides get into some advanced techniques and tools like quick masks that Photoshop Elements doesn’t have, but for the most part there are workarounds. Ditto for The GIMP.

Where the first workshop focused more on a basic understanding and tweaking of image color, contrast and adjusting a single image, this second workshop gets into the foundation of retouching and compositing: convincing cloning. Whether it’s for removing an element, extending backgrounds to rework compositions or adding an eye to the forehead of an ex, the clone tool is the tool for the job and learning how to use it well is important to getting convincing end results. So let’s put on our magical Photoshop hats (a Kleenex box will do) and get started.

Read entire article

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Photoshop CS2’s Lens Correction tool http://photoshopnews.com/2005/08/22/photoshop-cs2%e2%80%99s-lens-correction-tool/ http://photoshopnews.com/2005/08/22/photoshop-cs2%e2%80%99s-lens-correction-tool/#comments Mon, 22 Aug 2005 22:29:06 +0000 Rod Wynne-Powell http://photoshopnews.com/?p=654 Squeezing a bit more image area after using Photoshop CS2’s Lens Correction tool to restore verticals in some architectural images. (This only works with shots with simple foregrounds.)

I recently took a series of photos of high-rise buildings within London’s Paddington Basin and here was a way to use the water of the canal in the foreground to maximise the useable image area of the building itself without a major cloning operation.


Figure 1 – Click to see larger sized image in a new window.
Here is the image as shot with the 12-24mm Sigma using the Canon 10D.

As you can see, when straightening the verticals using Lens Correction alone you will lose almost all of the left tower.


Figure 2 – Click to see larger sized image in a new window.
Here is the Lens Correction Dialogue box with the adjustments I made to produce the image shown in Figure 3.

The very first thing I did was to use the ‘scrubby slider’ to change the grid size from the default setting. I did this whilst the image tiles were being loaded into the Preview window, by placing the cursor over the word ‘Size’ where the cursor changed to a hand and double arrows and dragging to the right to increase the spacing.
The next slider I used was Scale to allow me to retain the fullest extent of the sky.

I then made the major change by using Vertical Perspective and moving the slider to the left to widen the top (now you can see why I took the precaution of reducing the scale). You may wish to zoom in on the image for greater accuracy or use the Move Grid Tool to drag the grid to aid alignment. I went to the centre of the image to use the Straighten tool so that all my corrections were about this central axis.


Figure 3
When all the settings had been made, I clicked OK and then I added some guides to indicate the maximum rectangular area I could expect, as you can see in Figure 3.

If I do not want any canal to show you can see that I can show the pillar clearly, but if I want to show the full extent of water I will loose almost all of the tower unless I make up water by retouching.


Figure 4
Using this thought, I created a rectangular marqueed selection from that natural horizon and down to the lower limit created by the bottom right. I only transformed the area until the vertical was achieved. Purists might note the offset reflections, but most would miss this – poor cloning would be far worse and more time-consuming.


Figure 5

Now the image can be cropped with the same amount of building visible had the image been cropped tightly to the water’s edge, thus making a far more appealing composition and allowing for more space available for copy.


Figure 6

Here is the image with the new crop showing appreciably more of the left tower and more water space to add a strapline.


Figure 7 – Click to see larger sized image in a new window.

The end result, with true verticals, now has plenty of space for the Designer to work some copy into the image without encroaching the building. A minor gradation was placed over the top sky area to ensure the fine font was not lost in the white clouds.

 

About Rod Wynne-Powell

I have had to learn constantly, upgrade equipment and software equally constantly, and fortunately I have always enjoyed being challenged, so I am happy that I am still considered to be at what one commentator and friend has referred to as ‘the Bleeding Edge of Technology’!

Photography in all forms has been the mainstay of my work and the acquisition of a Canon 10D outfit has re-ignited my interest in taking pictures. My earlier experience equipped me with a knowledge of electronics, such that I understand a fair amount of what goes on behind the scenes with the hardware.

My inquisitive nature has put me in touch with Developers and Publishers of software over the years, resulting in my becoming a tester of pre-release software which continues to this day with work behind the scenes for the latest version of Photoshop and this puts me in a good position to offer clients the fruits of this participation.

I have provided my time to several authors with their books on Photoshop, which further establishes my knowledge of the ways in which the program can be exploited to produce high quality and imaginative images. I helped Martin Evening in the background for his latest book in the ‘Photoshop for Photographers’ series – CS2.

One of the many ways I maintain a presence in the marketplace is through my contacts with the ProDIG List and my connections to those Adobe refers to as the ‘Pixel Mafia’.

I am also fortunate to be known to Apple, Adobe and Calumet who have called upon my services or sponsored me to talk to organisations such as The Institute of Medical Illustrators, The BIPP, the AoP, and others such as Infot.

Text & images ©2005 by Rod Wynne-Powell – SOLUTIONS photographic

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Dr. Brown’s Services Updated to 1.2 http://photoshopnews.com/2005/08/21/dr-browns-services-updated-to-12/ http://photoshopnews.com/2005/08/21/dr-browns-services-updated-to-12/#comments Sun, 21 Aug 2005 21:14:41 +0000 Russell Preston Brown http://photoshopnews.com/?p=665
Russell Preston Brown updates Dr. Brown’s Services.

NEW 1.2 UPDATE!
- Caption Maker now supports easy PDF export.
- Place-A-Matic now supports 8 and 16 Bits/Channel documents.

Dr. Brown is back with a great new set of creative scripts for designers and photographers. Learn the wonders of using Smart Objects in Adobe Photoshop CS2. Create animations quickly and easily. Add captions to your images from metadata with Dr. Brown’s Caption Maker. These scripts will only work with Adobe Photoshop CS2 and Adobe Bridge CS2. Follow the instructions on the tutorial movies for installation. For easy installation on a Macintosh or PC, be sure to download Dr. Brown’s Easy Script Installer.

Dr. Brown’s Easy Script Installer 1.2

For Macintosh and Windows!
- Merge-A-Matic
- Place-A-Matic
- Caption Maker

MAC VERSION 1.2 UPDATE!

Sorry, the PC Installer has not been updated to version 1.2 at this time. You can still download Dr. Brown’s Services 1.2 and install them yourself. Follow the instructions on the tutorial movie.

Install all of the Dr. Brown Services with a click of a mouse. These script utilities take all the trouble out of loading scripts into the correct locations. However, nothing is perfect. If this installer does not run correctly on your machine, please follow the installation instructions found in the Caption Maker Tutorial. This script is designed to update any previous installation of Dr. Brown’s Services. However, if two copies of Dr. Brown’s Services should get installed by mistake. Make sure that only one copy of the script called “Dr. Brown’s Services.jsx” is in the Startup Scripts folder.

The new updates are available from the Tips & Techniques section of the Russell Brown Show!

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Photoshop Canvas Color Tip http://photoshopnews.com/2005/06/15/photoshop-canvas-color-tip/ http://photoshopnews.com/2005/06/15/photoshop-canvas-color-tip/#comments Wed, 15 Jun 2005 15:41:37 +0000 Jeff Schewe http://photoshopnews.com/?p=473 Ok, so what does Independence Pass (elevation 12,095 feet) have to do with Photoshop? Well, nothing, except that it is the image I chose to use to show you this nifty tip.

Have you ever wished that the canvas color (the area behind your document window) could be a different color? There’s a way and it’s been in Photoshop since version 4.0. If you’ve never heard this before, read on. . .


Normally, many users simply work in Photoshop with a standard document window as shown above.


When you reduce the size of your image or expand the document window, you’ll see the canvas inside your doc window but outside of your image. Often this canvas color is not as useful as it could be. That’s why the Photoshop engineers put in this little documented method of changing the color. Note, this works in all versions of Photoshop since 4.0 and on both Mac and Windows.


First, on the Photoshop tool bar, set your foreground color to the color and tone you wish in the canvas.


I’ll often set the color to be a neutral 50% gray rather than the 70% or so tone that is Photoshop’s default.


The next step is to select the Paint Bucket Tool as your active tool.


Next, with the document window expanded to reveal the canvas, use the Paint Bucket Tool, while holding the shift key (this is a crucial command) and click in the canvas.


As soon as you click, the canvas will become the color you’ve selected as the foreground color. Note, this is an app preference, so it’s not undoable.


There are other useful purposes for changing the canvas color–say you need to color and tone correct an image that will be set against paper white. It’s useful to view the tone & color against a tone that will give you a perceptual match to the paper. Also, if your image is to be reproduced against a strong color, you can choose to make the canvas the color that will be reproduced next to your image.


You can also use this new found tip to “play” with friends and co-workers. When nobody is looking, slip into Photoshop, choose a really nasty color, change the canvas and then close the image. They won’t have a clue what you’ve done-and unless they know the trick, they’ll have no idea what’s wrong! But don’t be mean about it. . .you can tell them how to “fix” their obvious problem. I’ve actually won bets (minor things like a free beer) that I could “fix” Photoshop.


Now, about the image I’ve used for this tip. I shot this on a motorcycle trip in June a couple of years ago while riding back to Chicago from a trip to LA.

This particular route, OVER A FRIGGIN’ MOUNTAIN in Colorado, was not my idea.


Click on the image to see larger sized image in a new window.

I generally don’t like RIDING IN THE SNOW, but my riding buddy, Carl Corey (of GalleryPrint.com) decided that this route looked “nice”. Fortunately, the tempurature wasn’t cold enough for the snow to stick to the road, but it did feel weird (and rather cold) to be riding through snow in June.

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AdobeEvangelists.com – NEW TIPS http://photoshopnews.com/2005/05/24/adobeevangelistscom-new-tips/ http://photoshopnews.com/2005/05/24/adobeevangelistscom-new-tips/#comments Tue, 24 May 2005 11:02:39 +0000 PSN Editorial Staff http://photoshopnews.com/?p=377

AdobeEvangelists.com has uploaded new Photoshop CS2 Tips and Techniques.

Camera Raw
Everything You Need to Know About Camera Raw

Adobe Bridge
The Next-generation File Browser

But wait! There’s more!
All of the other cool stuff in Photoshop CS2

Image Size
Common questions – Answered!

Where Things Are
Where does Photoshop CS2 keep _______?

Filters in Adobe Photoshop CS2

HDR (Hi-Dynamic Range)
Supported Features in HDR

Visit the Adobe Photoshop page to download the PDF’s.

Check out the main AdobeEvangelists.com web site for tips about:
Adobe Premiere Pro
Adobe After Effects
Adobe Encore DVD
Adobe GoLive
Adobe ImageReady
Adobe InDesign
Adobe Illustrator

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Creating Rough Edged Borders in Photoshop http://photoshopnews.com/2005/05/18/creating-rough-edge-borders-in-photoshop/ http://photoshopnews.com/2005/05/18/creating-rough-edge-borders-in-photoshop/#comments Wed, 18 May 2005 20:14:24 +0000 Martin Evening http://photoshopnews.com/2005/05/16/creating-rough-edge-borders-in-photoshop/ If you want to add a rough edged border to an image there are various ways you can do this. You can scan a border from one photographic image and merge it with another photograph as a layer. Or you can buy plug-ins for Photoshop that incorporate custom border designs.

But in the following technique I am going to show you a fairly simple way to generate a random rough edged border within Photoshop.

 


Before and after using Martin Evening’s rough edged border technique.

This technique makes use of the Clouds filter. The interesting thing about the Clouds filter is the randomness you get. So the borders that are produced using this method will never be exactly the same for each image. But first let’s take a quick look at working with the Clouds filters.

Working with the Clouds filters
These filters generate a cloud pattern that fills the whole image (or selected area) based on the foreground and background colors. The cloud pattern alters each time the filter is applied, so repeated filtering (Command/Control-F), for example, will produce a fresh cloudscape every time. If you hold down the Option key (Mac) or Alt key (PC) whilst applying the Clouds filter, the effect is magnified. The Difference Clouds filter has a cumulative effect on the image. Applying it once creates a cloud pattern based on the inverse color values. Repeating the filter produces clouds based on the original colors and so on… although after each filtration the clouds will become more pronounced and more contrasty.


This is a normal application of the Clouds plug-in filter.


This is a second application in difference mode.

Creating the rough edged border

Figure 1. To begin with I opened an image, added an empty new layer above the Background layer and chose Select > All. I followed this with Select > Modify > Border and entered a pixel value that was large enough to create the border size I wanted. Next, I feathered the selection by a smaller percentage. In this example I created a 36 pixel border selection and feathered it by 6 pixels.


Click on image to see larger sized image in a new window.

Figure 2. I then Reset the foreground/background colors so that Black was the foreground color and white the background color. I then went to the Filter menu and chose Render > Clouds.

Figure 3. I then added another empty new layer and with the selection still active, filled the selection with black and set the blend mode to Multiply.

Figure 4. I deselected the selection, merged the two newly added layers together and applied an extreme Levels adjustment to harden the edges of the border I had just created.


Click on image to see larger sized image in a new window.

Figure 5. Here is the final image showing the Background layer with the merged border layer set using the Multiply blend mode. The border effect will vary a lot depending on the pixel dimensions of the image. You can also create different types of borders by varying the feather amount and Levels adjustment.

The technique shown here was adapted from Martin Evening’s forthcoming book: Adobe Photoshop CS2 for Photographers, Focal Press. The first print edition is out now and a shipment of books is already on its way to suppliers in the UK and US. Deliveries to other countries will take longer.

Martin is happy to report that Amazon has apparently fixed the issue with his book’s title on their web store (see this PSN item SNAFU? FUBAR? Either way it’s Wrong) and books are now being sold at Amazon as well as Barnes & Noble. Ironically, Martin’s book zoomed up to be included in the top 100 books of all catagories shortly after the PSN article.

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Improve performance in Photoshop CS2 on computers with more than 1 GB RAM http://photoshopnews.com/2005/05/11/improve-performance-in-photoshop-cs2-on-computers-with-more-than-1-gb-ram/ http://photoshopnews.com/2005/05/11/improve-performance-in-photoshop-cs2-on-computers-with-more-than-1-gb-ram/#comments Wed, 11 May 2005 15:08:03 +0000 PSN Editorial Staff http://photoshopnews.com/2005/05/11/improve-performance-in-photoshop-cs2-on-computers-with-more-than-1-gb-ram/ Source: Photoshop Support Knowledgebase

Photoshop CS2 uses complex memory management procedures. On computers with 1 GB of RAM, or more, you can optimize Photoshop to take advantage of the quantity of RAM in your system to manage memory more efficiently.

About the Image Tile Size in Photoshop CS2

When Photoshop CS2 processes image data, it divides the image into sections called tiles. Each tile uses 68 KB of RAM.

You can activate the Bigger Tiles plug-in to increase the tile size to 132 KB. Activating the plug-in will reduce the overall amount of time Photoshop takes to process an image, especially on computers with more than 1 GB of RAM.

After you activate the Bigger Tiles plug-in, Photoshop will take longer to draw each tile and it may appear to draw images on screen slower, especially for large images or when applying some filters. However, the total time Photoshop needs to display the entire image will be less because it is drawing fewer tiles.

Activating the Photoshop CS2 Bigger Tiles plug-in

To enable the Bigger Tiles plug-in:

1. Close Photoshop CS2.

2. Locate the ~Bigger Tiles file inside the Photoshop CS2 plug-ins folder:

– Mac OS: Applications/Adobe Photoshop CS2/Plug-Ins/Adobe Photoshop Only/Extensions/Bigger Tiles

– Windows: Program Files\Adobe\Adobe Photoshop CS2\Plug-Ins\Adobe Photoshop Only\Extensions\Bigger Tiles

3. Rename the file, removing the tilde, ~ , from the file name.

4. Start Photoshop CS2.

Read entire article

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Multi-raw conversions using Smart Objects http://photoshopnews.com/2005/05/09/multi-raw-conversions-using-smart-objects/ http://photoshopnews.com/2005/05/09/multi-raw-conversions-using-smart-objects/#comments Mon, 09 May 2005 22:58:11 +0000 Martin Evening http://photoshopnews.com/2005/05/09/multi-raw-conversions-using-smart-objects/

Here’s a tip for using the new Smart Object feature of Photoshop CS2 and mutiple raw exposures with Camera Raw to produce a simple high dynamic range image blend.

It has been suggested that we may see one-shot cameras with extended dynamic ranges and we are already seeing the potential to record a wide range of tones with the cameras that are in use today. But when shooting outside, we often encounter scenes whose dynamic range is beyond what today’s cameras can capture. To get the most out of our raw files it can sometimes be useful to use the Camera Raw plug-in to interpret the raw data using two or more conversions and combine these together as layers and blend them together to produce a single composite image. This will work, but requires many steps. The other way is to place the raw files as Smart Objects in Photoshop CS2.

To do this, you need to select a raw camera file in Bridge and go to the Bridge main menu and choose File > Place > In Photoshop. This is the simplest way to convert a raw image into a Smart Object. Once the image is placed in this way you can create an unlinked duplicate of the Smart Object layer by choosing Layer > Smart Objects > New Smart Object via Copy. Then go to the Layers palette and choose Edit Contents to make further adjustments to both the original and the copied Smart Object layer (or layers). So let’s have a quick look at how you can do this in Photoshop CS2.


Figure 1 – To begin with I created a new document in Photoshop using a preset setting that matched the standard size pixel dimensions of the camera I was using.


Figure 2 – I then selected a raw image in Bridge. . .


Figure 3 – . . .and chose File > Place > In Photoshop from the Bridge menu. This opened the selected image in Photoshop and placed it as a Smart Object Layer above the Background layer.


Click on image to see full size dialog in a new window.
Figure 4 – As the layer was placed, the Camera Raw dialog opened allowing me to edit the Camera Raw settings before clicking Open to OK the settings for this first placed, Smart Object layer.


Figure 5 – Here you can see the camera raw image placed as a Smart Object layer in the layers palette. I then moused down on this first Smart Object layer using Control (Mac) right mouse (PC) to access the contextual menu and selected New Smart Object via Copy.


Figure 6 – This created a new duplicate Smart Object layer.


Click on image to see full size dialog in a new window.
Figure 7 – I was able to edit the Contents of the copied Smart Object layer by choosing Edit Contents from the Layers palette menu or by simply double-clicking the Smart Object layer. In the dialog shown here, you can see that I applied a lighter image adjustment to bring out more detail in the shadows. I then clicked the Open button to OK the adjustment. This updated the Smart Object copy layer.


Figure 8 – Finally, I added a layer mask to the copy layer and applied a black to white gradient to create a transitional fade between the two smart object layers.

Figure 9 – The final combination blends the two different exposures to produce this result.

This technique can be adapted in various ways. For example, you can use the layer blending options to change the layer blend mode or double-click the layer to open the Layer Style dialog where you can adjust the Blend if: This Layer options to adjust the transition between the two Smart Object layers.

There is also a much quicker way to place Camera Raw files as Smart Object layers. You can cut out steps 1,2, 4 and 5 completely by using Dr. Brown’s new Place-A-Matic script for Bridge. To find and get hold of this script, go to the PSN story: Dr. Brown – New Scripts!, from there you will be able to download the Dr. Brown’s Services 1.0 script for Bridge. And do remember to watch the movie as this will show you how to install the script correctly on a Mac or PC computer. Once you have installed the Dr. Brown’s Services 1.0 script, select the photograph in Bridge that you want to place and then go to the Bridge Tools menu and choose the above script from the menu.

The script will automatically create a new document with the correct dimensions and open the Camera Raw dialog to allow you to adjust the settings for the first camera raw Smart Object layer. After you click Open, the script will automatically create a duplicate camera raw Smart Object layer and allow you to create a new camera raw setting for the second Smart Object layer.

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Work Smart with Smart Objects http://photoshopnews.com/2005/04/29/work-smart-with-smart-objects/ http://photoshopnews.com/2005/04/29/work-smart-with-smart-objects/#comments Fri, 29 Apr 2005 15:56:44 +0000 Martin Evening http://photoshopnews.com/2005/04/28/work-smart-with-smart-objects/ null

This is the result of replacing an image in the book using the new Smart Objects and Warp features in Photoshop CS2.

The Transform command in Photoshop allows you to scale and change the shape of an image. But one of the drawbacks of using this tool is that up until now, it has always been a one-way process in which the pixels inevitably become degraded as successive transforms are applied. The new Smart Object feature in Photoshop CS2 allows you to preserve the integrity of the image data by applying the transform changes to a proxy version of the image instead of editing the original pixels.

In the following tutorial Martin Evening shows you how to edit a Smart Object layer using the Transform tool in combination with the new Warp mode in Photoshop CS2.

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Figure 1. The starting point here is a picture of an open book that has been photographed using natural daylight. Over the next few steps I will show you how to add a new image on a layer and then apply a warp transformation to make it match the appearance of the photograph on the right hand page.

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Figure 2. When you add a new layer in Photoshop CS2 you can promote it to become a Smart Object via the Layers palette fly-out menu. Once a layer (or group of layers) has been grouped to become a Smart Object its status will be indicated by the Smart Object layer icon in the bottom right corner of the layer thumbnail icon. Once you have created a Smart Object you can carry out multiple transforms to the Smart Object layer without progressively degrading the pixels.

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Figure 3. In this next step, the Smart Object layer was scaled down in size via the Image menu Transform command so that the photograph on the Smart Object layer was roughly the same size as the photograph in the book.

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Figure 4. You can switch from the Transform mode to Warp mode by clicking on the button (circled) in the tool options bar. This button will allow you to toggle easily between the transform and warp modes. In the example shown here, I was able to use the corner warp handles to distort the Smart Object layer so that it matched the shape of the photograph on the page below.

Figure 5. Once I had warped the photograph, I needed to make sure it matched the lighting in the original photograph. To do this, I added a new curves adjustment layer above the Right page layer. I then created a clipping mask so that the Curves adjustment layer adjusted the Right page layer only. One easy way to create a clipping mask is to Option/Alt click the divider between the adjustment layer and image layer. To release a clipping mask, Option/Alt click on the divider again.

In this example I applied a curves adjustment to darken the image to match the original image’s lighting. I filled the adjustment layer mask with black to hide the adjustment effect and then selected the paintbrush, using white as the foreground color, to paint in the darkening adjustment across the left edge of the picture so that the photograph on the Right page layer matched the shading in the original photograph.

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Figure 6. You can edit a Smart Object layer by double-clicking on the thumbnail image icon in the Layers palette. This will open the Smart Object layer as a separate document. In the example shown here, I added a new Hue/Saturation adjustment layer to colorize the image. Once you have finished editing the Smart Object layer, use File > Save or Command/Control-S to save any changes made. This will update the Smart Object layer in the master/parent image and if you wish you can now close the Smart Object image window.

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Figure 7. In the final version shown here you can see all the changes that I made in which I replaced the photograph on the right hand page with a new one that matched the shape and lighting of the original and also matched the color of the photograph on the left hand page.

 

Martin Evening is the author of Photoshop CS2 for Photographers published by Focal Press. This new edition will be hitting the stores the third week of May, 2005.

Based in London, Martin is an advertising photographer and noted expert in both photography and digital imaging. As a successful photographer, Martin is well known in London for his fashion and beauty work. Check out Martin’s web site.

In addition, Martin is a principal of PixelGenius where he designed and was product manger for the recently released PhotoKit Color. PhotoKit Color applies precise color corrections, automatic color balancing and creative coloring effects. PhotoKit Color offers a comprehensive set of coloring tools for Photoshop 7.0 and Photoshop CS for both Macintosh and Windows.

Martin also works with the Adobe Photoshop engineering team consulting on new feature development and alpha and beta testing. He worked alpha & beta for Photoshop CS2 and was influential in the new Adobe Bridge and Camera Raw 3.0.

 

 

 

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Camera Raw 3, Photoshop CS2 & Bridge http://photoshopnews.com/2005/04/26/camera-raw-3-photoshop-cs2-bridge/ http://photoshopnews.com/2005/04/26/camera-raw-3-photoshop-cs2-bridge/#comments Tue, 26 Apr 2005 20:01:55 +0000 Jeff Schewe http://photoshopnews.com/?p=267
The release of Adobe Photoshop CS2 heralds a brand new version of Adobe Camera Raw. With the 3.0 version, Camera Raw has come of age as a significant workflow workhorse rather than a mere Plug-in for processing raw digital captures into Photoshop. Where once Camera Raw was tied to Photoshop alone in a modal processing state-one image at a time, Camera Raw has been expanded into a new dual-purpose role by working in both Adobe Bridge, and Photoshop CS2 for processing raw files. (Bridge is Adobe’s new file browsing application.) Now, a photographer can adjust settings of raw files while Camera Raw is hosted by Bridge and be processing images by Camera Raw hosted by Photoshop CS2-at the same time. Camera Raw has broken its modal shackles.

While the basic appearance of the plug-in is reminiscent of it’s previous incarnation, some substantial new tools have been added along with interface and usability enhancements. One can choose to hide the Workflow Options to expand the preview areas of Camera Raw. In addition to the previous RGB color readouts, there’s a new Color Sampler tool that allows for up to 9 color sample readings that persist until cleared. Users can also select options to show both highlight and shadow clipping points while adjusting images. Two additional tools grace the top of the tool bar-the Crop tool and a slick new way of auto-determining rotational correction with the Straighten tool.


This is the default Camera Raw Dialog with the new functionality.
Click on the image to see the full dialog in a new window.


In this view, the “Workflow Options” have been hidden to allow for a larger Preview. Note: the option to Always Fit in View makes it easier to display the preview as large as possible in the dialog.
Click on the image to see the full dialog in a new window.


In this view, the figure shows the ability to display up to 9 color samples in the image.
Click on the image to see the full dialog in a new window.


The ability to show highlight and shadow clipping live by using the check boxes. The color indicates which channel is clipping.
Click on the image to see the full dialog in a new window.


The new Level tool in Camera Raw 3 allows for easy rotational corrections. The Level tool is being used at the bottom of the plate.
Click on the image to see the full dialog in a new window.


This is the result of the rotation correction showing the crop required. Additional cropping can be done or you can remove the crop entirely. Note, the crop is only applied to the processed file, the crop does not alter your original raw file.
Click on the image to see the full dialog in a new window.

The truly unexpected cool new feature of Camera Raw 3.0 has got to be its new filmstrip mode. When selecting multiple images, either while being hosted in Bridge or in Photoshop, Camera Raw shows, in a strip at the side, thumbnails of all the selected images. It is in this mode that Camera Raw’s newly found dual role really refines the workflow potential. Select multiple images inside of Bridge and by using the Open in Camera Raw (Mac-Command/Win-Control ‘R’) you actually are opening the images into Camera Raw hosted by Bridge, not Photoshop. However, Camera Raw can also be used by Photoshop-at the exact same time-for processing images in the background. Just click on the Save Images to add the images to a processing queue you set up. In the meantime you can continue adjusting images and even exit the Camera Raw dialog box while Photoshop keeps chugging in the background processing images.



This is the Camera Raw 3 Film Strip mode. Selecting multiple images in Bridge allow you to work with multiple images in Camera Raw at the same time.
Click on the image to see the full dialog in a new window.

There is very little difference in Camera Raw’s appearance whether Bridge or Photoshop is hosting it. The only real clue is the highlighting of either the “Done” button or the “Open” button.


When Bridge is hosting Camera Raw, the Done button is highlighted.


When hosted by Photoshop it’s the Open button that’s highlighted.

Why’s this a big deal? First off, it means you don’t even need Photoshop launched to be able to adjust raw settings, crop, rotate or do image selection ratings. You can do all of that just with Bridge launched. You don’t need Photoshop launched until it comes time for processing the images. Secondly, you can be adjusting the image settings in the foreground while sending images for processing by Photoshop in the background. This greatly extends the workflow options and cuts down on the time it takes photographers to arrive at fully optimized processed files.


Click on the image to see the full dialog in a new window.

The Save dialog allows for choosing the destination for the saved file, renaming and allows file conversion from raw to DNG, JPG, TIFF and PSD with file format options.

Yes, you can still use Actions and Batch operations in Photoshop if you wish. And yes, you can use the Image Processor to process images whose settings have already been adjusted. But for those who need to be adjusting settings while processing in the background, this new functionality completely changes the old way of working with Camera Raw in Photoshop.


The new Image Processor, which is the descendent of the old Dr. Brown’s Processor.
Click on the image to see the full dialog in a new window.

This article is an excerpt of an article coming out in the May/June issue of Digital Photo Pro magazine.

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Adobe Bridge and Camera Raw 3 – Shortcuts http://photoshopnews.com/2005/04/16/adobe-bridge-and-camera-raw-3-%e2%80%93-shortcuts/ http://photoshopnews.com/2005/04/16/adobe-bridge-and-camera-raw-3-%e2%80%93-shortcuts/#comments Sat, 16 Apr 2005 18:40:13 +0000 Ian Lyons http://photoshopnews.com/?p=399 So, Photoshop CS2 has been announced and with it we get a host of new features such as: Vanishing Point, Smart Object, Smart Sharpen, Image Warping, 32-bit support Merge to HDR, Lens Correction, Noise Reduction plus a lot of others under the bonnet. Along with these new features we also find a significantly enhanced version of Camera Raw and a completely new companion application called Adobe Bridge.

From the very first day I began beta testing Photoshop CS2 it was Bridge along with Camera Raw 3 that became my favourites. Why Bridge and Camera Raw? Well, I’m primarily a photographer and whilst the other new features will play an important role in the image making process, it is in the initial phase of this process where photographers will benefit the most. As a photographer I can easily find myself processing many hundreds of images after a day’s shooting, so anything that makes that task easier and more efficient is to be welcomed. Since Bridge is a standalone application, it is far more flexible and less of a resource hog than File Browser ever was. In fact, during beta some testers referred to Bridge as being like “the File Browser on steroids”.

The default view of Bridge will be familiar to those already using File Browser but the range of tools and commands make it much easier to carry out tasks such as sorting, labeling and ranking large numbers of images.

The digital light box concept first seen in File Browser has been enhanced by the inclusion of workspace layout presets that include the very useful Filmstrip view and another called Versions and Alternates. For me, the Slideshow feature is also a real winner in that a show can be viewed full-screen or in it’s own window.

The improvements to workflow made possible by enabling Camera Raw to function outside of Photoshop will make life a lot easier for photographers. Likewise, incorporating features such as Auto Adjustments, Crop, Straighten and, of course, the very welcome Curves tool. (see Bruce Fraser’s article on The Power of the Curve)

Obviously, being standalone, Bridge has it’s own menu options and keyboard shortcuts, many of which have been borrowed from its predecessor. This brings me to the one area of Photoshop that I’ve always been hopeless at… keyboard shortcuts and modifiers.

I’m not a keyboard junkie and my ability to memorize shortcuts isn’t as good as it should be, so if I can use the mouse or a menu option to access a feature or tool I usually will. However, as the beta programme progressed it became clear that many of the workflow enhancements built into Bridge and Camera Raw 3 could best be exploited via the keyboard. Unfortunately, a lot of these shortcuts were not documented, that is until Thomas Knoll posted the list for Camera Raw.

As I found myself using these shortcuts on a more regular basis, I realised that the wider Photoshop community might find them as beneficial as I did and so I began the task of documenting all of the Bridge & Camera Raw shortcuts that I could find. Hopefully the two Adobe Acrobat PDF files that I’ve included here will help you get the best from Bridge and Camera Raw when you get your hands on Photoshop CS2.

Adobe Bridge and Camera Raw Shortcuts for Macintosh
(99KB PDF)

Adobe Bridge and Camera Raw Shortcuts for Windows
(97KB PDF)

About Ian Lyons
As a keen and active Northern Ireland based “amateur” photographer, Ian Lyons’ interests include both conventional Photography and Digital Imaging. The images he shoots vary widely in subject matter and technique.

For Ian, the use of computers in the preparation of an image simply offers an attractive alternative to techniques that he had successfully practiced over many years in the conventional darkroom. Ian firmly believes that digital imaging is of benefit to the world of photography.

His web site, Computer-Darkroom offers a wide array of useful tutorials, reviews and articles. Also included are galleries of his photographic work.

As a beta tester of Photoshop CS2 he was deemed the official chief Photoshop Engineer Antagonist and earned the nickname the “Leprish Iricon”. Ian finagled his own shortcut from the Bridge engineers: Cmd+Shift+Option+O returns/opens Photoshop without opening any images whilst also closing the Bridge window. For Windows, Control+Shift+Alt+O.

Ian has been developing new tutorials for Photoshop CS2 that will be posted on his web site with an occasional article here on PhotoshopNews. Ian also volunteers as one of the Adobe User to User Forum moderators for the Photoshop, Camera Raw and DNG forums.

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