PhotoshopNews.com
May 7, 2007

CONTACT TORONTO PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL

OVER 500 LOCAL, NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL ARTISTS PARTICIPATE AT MORE THAN 200 VENUES ACROSS THE GTA.

TORONTO — CONTACT, Toronto’s premier annual photography festival, is launching for it’s 11th year and taking over the GTA. From May 1 – 31, 2007, the work of professional, emerging and established photographers will transform Toronto into a huge art gallery as restaurants, government buildings, public spaces, street corners, hotels, schools, museums and galleries become the backdrop for their work.

The theme of the 2007 festival explores The Constructed Image. Using different material, influences and disciplines often combined through technology, photography’s relationship with reality has been transformed by the numerous ways in which images are now constructed. The Constructed Image will explore this fusion of practices that has transformed the nature of photography into a new hybrid genre.

“This year will be our 11th year presenting the festival,” says Emily McInnes, Director of Development for CONTACT, “and we are thrilled to feature renowned Canadian artists and present Canadian premiere exhibitions of international photographers.”

CONTACT’s premier exhibition The Constructed Image: Photographic Culture, at the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art, includes 10 artists from nine countries. New to the festival this year, is CONTACT’s Portfolio Review Exhibition in the HP Gallery at Waddington’s. Once again, CONTACT will spill onto the streets with public installations on transit shelters and city spaces, along with an excitng display inside the St Patrick subway station. CONTACT hosts 35 Feature Exhibitions at 25 venues across the city, including many top national and international photographers.

Rounding out the festival, this year’s programs include films on photography at the National Film Board, a lecture series, a photographic scavenger hunt with Shoot Experience and over 175 open exhibitions.

For more information check out the CONTACT web site.

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