PhotoshopNews.com
Jun 15, 2005

Slow performance and screen redraw problems in Photoshop (CS2 on Windows)

Source: Photoshop Support Knowledgebase

You may encounter performance or redraw issues in Adobe Photoshop CS2 if you run it on a computer that has an older video card installed or that uses an older video card driver because of the increased demand in Photoshop for system resources. Older video cards use slower processors and less RAM than is optimal for processing screen redraws in Photoshop.

If you use an older video card or a video card that has less than 128 MB of RAM, you may experience performance or screen redraw problems in Photoshop, including (but not limited to) the following:

– Photoshop runs extremely slowly, or slows down suddenly.

– Windows, palettes, images, and selections don’t redraw correctly when partially covered by dialog boxes.

– Images redraw very slowly when edited.

– Menus don’t appear or you can’t access menu items.

– The pointer disappears when you move it around the screen or between two screens.

– The pointer displays an hourglass each time it hovers over a palette (such as the Layers palette).

– Dialog boxes are blank.

– Errors occur, such as “This application needs to close.”

– Redraw of layer edges is delayed after you enable Show Layer Edges.

Different factors can cause slow performance and screen redraw problems, including hardware, operating system settings, and software settings. To benefit most from this document, perform the following tasks in order. Keep track of the tasks that you perform and the results of each, including errors and other problems. Adobe Technical Support can use this information to better assist you if you need to call.

1. Reduce the image cache level.

You can reduce the amount of memory that some images use by reducing the Cache Level to 2 in the Memory & Image Cache preferences.

To reduce the image cache level:

1. Choose Edit > Preferences > Memory & Image Cache

2. Set the Cache Levels to 2.

2. Reduce or disable the hardware acceleration in Windows.

Reducing or disabling hardware acceleration may temporarily resolve problems caused by older video card drivers.

To disable or reduce graphics hardware acceleration in Windows XP:

1. Choose Start > Control Panel > Display.

2. Click the Settings tab.

3. Click Advanced.

4. Do one of the following:

– To disable hardware acceleration, move the Hardware acceleration slider to None.

– To reduce hardware acceleration, move the Hardware acceleration slider to a setting between None and Full.

5. Click Apply and then click OK to accept the new setting and close the dialog box.

6. Restart Windows and Photoshop.

To disable or reduce graphics hardware acceleration in Windows 2000:

1. Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel.

2. Double-click Display, click the Settings tab, and then click Advanced.

3. Click the Troubleshooting tab.

4. Do one of the following:

– To disable hardware acceleration, move the Hardware acceleration slider to None.

– To reduce hardware acceleration, move the Hardware acceleration slider to a setting between None and Full.

5. Click OK to accept the new setting, and then click OK to close the Display Properties dialog box.

6. Restart Windows and Photoshop.

3. Update the video card driver.

You may have an outdated video card driver, even if you only recently purchased the video card. Many video card manufacturers frequently update their software drivers.Contact the video card manufacturer for an updated driver, or download one from the manufacturer’s website. (To determine the manufacturer of a video card, view the card’s properties in Device Manager.) You can often determine if the video driver is outdated by changing the color depth and resolution of the video card or by disabling graphics hardware acceleration.

4. If your video card has less than 128 MB of RAM, consider updating it.

For optimum performance in Photoshop, use a newer video card that has greater than 128 MG of RAM.

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